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The Difference Between Embossing and Debossing

The Difference Between Embossing and Debossing

The Difference Between Embossing And Debossing

REPRINTED: Kwik Kopy

Author: Karin Ingram

To emboss, or deboss – that is the question.

They are both techniques used to imprint impressed or depressed images onto paper which can add that extra something to your print jobs. To decide which approach could be right for your business, let’s take a look at the differences between the two.

Embossing Vs. Debossing

Embossing is when you raise a logo or other image to create a 3D graphic. This raised design is achieved by pushing a metal die into paper, card stock (or other chosen material) from underneath. The raised area can then have ink or foil applied to it for added effect or it can be left unprinted or unfoiled (i.e. known as a blind emboss).

Example of embossing

Debossing is the opposite of embossing as you are creating an indent in the material you are using. A metal die is stamped onto the front of the material you are using causing depressions that leave a (debossed) imprint of the image on your paper, card stock (or other chosen material). You can choose to leave the debossing as it is (i.e. known as a blind deboss) or you can fill the indentation with ink.

Example of deboosing

 

Both embossing and debossing can be used in combination with offset printing or foil stamping to add depth and impact to a design. Dies can be sculpted as single-level, multilevel, sculptured or with beveled edges to create striking, multi-dimensional designs.

Business cards, stationery and presentation folders are just some of the collateral that can be custom embossed or debossed for your business. Business cards really lend themselves to both techniques, although embossing is far more common than debossing. When you emboss your business card you will most likely have the reverse image on the back of the card and the embossed image on the front. If you choose debossing on a thick card material however, then only one side of your business card will be affected.

If embossing or debossing aren’t for you, there are many other finishing options to choose from.  For advice on the right finishing touches for all your print collateral, speak to the team at your local Kwik Kopy today.

Foiling finishing

Foiling produced by Kwik Kopy Hornsby


ABOUT LED MENU LIGHT

LED Menu Light manufactures and sells LED illuminated Menu Covers, Boards and Check Presenters
All of our LED menus are made with soft white LED light for easy reading just like the Kindle and E-Readers. This is perfect for customers who have a hard time reading tiny type on menus in dimly lit restaurants.

WEBSITE:  https://ledmenulight.com

Contact: Marvin Barenbaum, 201-741-8292

Would You Like to See the Menu? Try Using Your iPhone Flashlight

Would You Like to See the Menu? Try Using Your iPhone Flashlight

Would You Like to See the Menu? Try Using Your iPhone Flashlight

As restaurants grow increasingly dim, even younger diners are reaching for their cellphones.

Sitting at the bar at Pops for Champagne while in Chicago on business, Joseph Davey, 52 years old, couldn’t read the menu to decipher drink options in the near-darkness.

So he did the only reasonable thing he could: He pulled out his phone flashlight and lit up the page.

“I’m no spring chicken, but I don’t consider myself a senior citizen either,” said Mr. Davey, a restaurant beverage director who lives in Indianapolis. Scrutinizing what he described as “a great selection of bubbles,” by the light of an iPhone 7 might have hinted at decrepitude—except, he said, drinkers decades younger than him were doing the same.

The trend in restaurant design isn’t just romantically moody and dim, but downright inky, leaving aspiring menu-readers with little choice but to whip out their cellphone flashlights. They may illuminate the mysteries of the entrees, but can also bust the vibe of any downtown brasserie’s amber glow with the cold lasers of light-emitting diodes.

Pops for Champagne sets the lighting to appeal to a “diverse demographic, young and old,” and hears few grumbles, said co-owner Tom Verhey. The bar did recently increase the font size on the menu, as part of a re-design, and that made it easier to read, he said.

“I’m not Abe Lincoln that I can read by candlelight,” said Lisa Beach, 54, a freelance writer in Orlando, Fla. “I need more than two watts to read an entire menu.” Alas, Ms. Beach said, she often must provide those watts herself with mood-killing “bright white-bluish light” from her iPhone 7.

Lisa Beach at a restaurant in Florida using her iPhone 7 to read the menu. PHOTO: KEVIN BEACH

 

Brian Maier, 37, said using his Samsung Galaxy Note 5 to read the menu at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Austin, Texas, made his mind flash to a late-night commercial for a credit-card sized magnifying glass with a light, featuring white-haired actors.

“It made me feel like, ‘have I reached that stage of my life, where I’m that elderly person?’ ” he said.

Dinner has definitely gotten darker, said Andrew Knowlton, the 44-year-old editor at large at Bon Appétit magazine, who has eaten in roughly 400 restaurants annually for nearly 15 years. When he began his career, restaurants were generally split between upscale places and “mom and pops,” he said. Now, more restaurants are competing in the in-between zone, expected to provide good cuisine and a fashionable atmosphere. For those with lower budgets, turning the lights down is a quick fix, he said.

 

Mr. Knowlton said he finds it embarrassing when other diners—even worse are his own dining companions (“I’m going to give my wife up,” he said)—resort to the cellphone solution. He vowed he will never succumb. “I’d rather give up restaurants.”

Television host and comedian Scott Nevins, 37, once took an equally hard line, mocking friends when they resorted to the cell phone flashlight while dining out in San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles, where he lives. Then he ended up in the hospital after eating some undercooked chicken in a restaurant.

Since then, Mr. Nevins wouldn’t dream of putting a piece of chicken in his mouth before an analysis aided by his iPhone—“on full high beams, like you could land at LAX,” he said. His mortified friends groan and threaten to abandon him at the table. “I always say, ‘Oh be quiet. It’ll be three seconds,’ ” he said.

 
Granville West Hollywood on Friday night. PHOTO: KEN BARNETT

The ideal way to balance atmosphere and legibility is two-pronged, said David Rockwell, an architect who has designed restaurants including Nobu and Union Square Café in New York. One set of lights along the room’s perimeter or ceiling sets the overall ambience, while each table also gets its own light to enable diners to see close up.

That’s expensive and hard to perfect, which is why some restaurateurs celebrate the cultural shift in which patrons arrive packing their own lanterns.

“It means restaurants don’t have to worry about it,” said Marc Dix, food and beverage manager for Granville Restaurant Group, which has four restaurants in Los Angeles. “They can just go ahead and create the atmosphere they want.”

Though Granville staffers try to help diners who complain by bringing extra candles or even aiming their own cell phone flashlights at menus, one thing they won’t do is turn up the lights.

 

“We do get a couple of complaints about noise level and darkness,” Mr. Dix said. “But that’s the vibe that keeps everything going.”

In Scottsdale, Ariz., when David Gottlieb and his wife, Miriam, took their seats on the patio of Local Bistro, they quickly turned on their phone flashlights. When he looked up, Mr. Gottlieb said he saw other patrons doing the same. “There was no shame in it,” said the 72-year-old software engineer. “There was no other way to read the menu.”

Mr. Gottlieb said it was so dark that when he put down his phone to eat, he couldn’t tell whether he was stabbing steak or potato with his fork.

Laura Osio, marketing director for Osio Culinary Group, which owns Local Bistro and two other restaurants in Scottsdale, stands by the secret sauce of dusky ambience. “Diners prefer to have a more intimate atmosphere at dinner, which is created by dimming the lights,” she said, adding that lighting complaints are rare.

Stephani Robson, a lecturer at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration, said her research has shown changing the lighting doesn’t change what people order. But she said restaurants probably cling to the concept because a “yellow, firelit glow” makes both people and food look better.

Moreover, diners don’t hesitate using their smartphones for just about everything else, said Greg Sage, operating partner and general manager for Ocean Prime steakhouse in Beverly Hills.

“They text, check email, check reviews of the restaurant they are in,” he said. “I walk by and see that they are trying to figure out what to order from Yelp.”

Write to Katy McLaughlin at katy.mclaughlin@wsj.com and Anupreeta Das at anupreeta.das@wsj.com


ABOUT LED MENU LIGHT

LED Menu Light manufactures and sells LED illuminated Menu Covers, Boards and Check Presenters
All of our LED menus are made with soft white LED light for easy reading just like the Kindle and E-Readers. This is perfect for customers who have a hard time reading tiny type on menus in dimly lit restaurants.

WEBSITE:  https://ledmenulight.com

Contact: Marvin Barenbaum, 201-741-8292

LED Menu Light Selects New Colors for 2019 Product Line

LED Menu Light Selects New Colors for 2019 Product Line

The graphic designers and stylists at LED Menu Light have made their final selection of new colors for 2019.

LED Menu Light have backlit inside covers that light up when the menu is opened making it easy for patron to read the type. Restaurants with dimly lit settings use them for food menus, wine lists and dessert menus; and also check presenter colors.

Menu covers are sold as blanks or with your logo custom printed on the cover. Custom LED Menus come in an assortment of new colors and textures and add a touch of class to your restaurant. They are available for sale at www.ledmenulight.com


ABOUT LED MENU LIGHT

LED Menu Light manufactures and sells LED illuminated Menu Covers, Boards and Check Presenters
All of our LED menus are made with soft white LED light for easy reading just like the Kindle and E-Readers. This is perfect for customers who have a hard time reading tiny type on menus in dimly lit restaurants.

WEBSITE:  https://ledmenulight.com

Contact: Marvin Barenbaum, 201-741-8292